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2018 VIP Draft Kit


Table of Contents




Draft Day Advice
-General Advice
-Position Advice

-2018 NFL Schedule
-Strength of Schedule


QB Statistical Analysis
-2017 Top Performances
-2017 Most Fantasy Points
-2017 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2017 Median Fantasy Points
-2017 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2018 Schedule
-Easiest 2018 Playoff Schedule

RB Statistical Analysis
-2017 Top Performances
-2017 Most Fantasy Points
-2017 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2017 Median Fantasy Points
-2017 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2018 Schedule
-Easiest 2018 Playoff Schedule

WR Statistical Analysis
-2017 Top Performances
-2017 Most Fantasy Points
-2017 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2017 Median Fantasy Points
-2017 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2018 Schedule
-Easiest 2018 Playoff Schedule

TE Statistical Analysis
-2017 Top Performances
-2017 Most Fantasy Points
-2017 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2017 Median Fantasy Points
-2017 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2018 Schedule
-Easiest 2018 Playoff Schedule

Kicker Statistical Analysis
-2017 Top Performances
-2017 Most Fantasy Points
-2017 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2017 Median Fantasy Points
-2017 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2018 Schedule
-Easiest 2018 Playoff Schedule

2017 Defense Rankings
-Fantasy Points Allowed (Total)
-Fantasy Points Allowed QBs
-Fantasy Points Allowed RBs
-Fantasy Points Allowed WRs
-Fantasy Points Allowed TEs
-Fantasy Points Allowed Ks

Proven Draft Strategy
-Numerical Analysis
-GCAM (Overview)
-GCAM (QBs)
-GCAM (RBs)
-GCAM (WRs)
-GCAM (TEs)
-GCAM (PKs)
-GCAM (D/ST)

Targets, Carries and Touches
-2017 Most Targets
-2017 Most Carries
-2017 Most Touches

Redzone Analysis
-2017 Redzone Passing
-2017 Redzone Rushing
-2017 Redzone Receiving
-2017 Redzone Touches

Depth Charts
-AFC East
-AFC North
-AFC South
-AFC West
-NFC East
-NFC North
-NFC South
-NFC West

Nagging Injuries
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs

Moving Truck Tracker
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs

Rookie Report
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-Dynasty/Rookie Snapshot

Sophomore Status
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs

Fantasy Studs
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-D/ST

Sleepers
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-D/ST

Duds
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-D/ST

Average Draft Position
-Top 150
-QB
-RB
-WR
-TE
-PK
-D/ST
-DL
-LB
-DB

ATC Cheat Sheets
QB Rankings
RB Rankings
WR Rankings
TE Rankings
PK Rankings
Team Defense/Special Teams Rankings
DL Rankings
LB Rankings
DB Rankings
Draft Board Snapshot
Top 200 Players Overall
Top 216 Auction Values

MOCK DRAFT

WR 2nd Year Players

 

Smith-Schuster, JuJu - PIT

Smith-Schuster, JuJu

Smith-Schuster finished as the top rookie performer at the position last season and it wasn’t even close. He reeled in 58 of his 77 targets for 917 yards and seven touchdowns while earning the highest WR grade by a rookie in the PFF era. The Steeler led all wide receivers with an impressive 11.9 yards per target mark while posting an average depth of target for 10.4, helping Pittsburgh force the issue downfield. Considering that he just turned 21 in November, there is still plenty of room for growth. Smith-Schuster offers loads of dynasty potential and should be viewed as a back-end WR2 with some upside for the 2018 campaign.


Davis, Corey - TEN

Davis, Corey

Davis was the fifth overall pick in the 2017 draft. A hamstring injury cost him five games and limited him to 34 catches for 375 yards and no touchdowns on 64 targets. Including a pair of playoff games, Davis was on the field for 89 percent of the team's pass plays during his 12 full games and handled 6.3 targets per game (20 percent share). Davis' lack of touchdowns was disappointing, but Titans quarterbacks managed only 14 passing scores during the regular season, and he did go on to find the end zone twice in the playoffs. Davis enters 2018 as Tennessee's No. 1 wide receiver and a strong bet for a breakout season.


Taylor, Trent - SF

Taylor, Trent

The 49ers selected Taylor in the fifth round of the 2017 NFL draft, and the Louisiana Tech product quickly took control as their slot man. Taylor was on the field for 54 percent of the team's pass plays as a rookie and caught 43 passes for 430 yards and a pair of touchdowns. Extremely undersized at 5-foot-8, 179 pounds, Taylor was a short-area target (his 6.6 aDOT and 10.0 yards per reception were both fifth-lowest) with minimal work near the goal line (three end zone targets). With Pierre Garcon and Marquise Goodwin ahead of him, Taylor is no more than a sleeper in PPR leagues.


Westbrook, Dede - JAC

Westbrook, Dede

A core muscle injury cost Westbrook the first nine games of his career, but the talented rookie burst onto the NFL scene with a 51-27-339-1 line in seven regular-season games. Westbrook was on the field for 90 percent of the team's pass plays and handled 22 percent of the targets (7.3 per game) ' massive usage for a midround pick who debuted near midseason. He has big upside as a playmaker, but scoring opportunities will be few and far between with him at 6-foot, 178 pounds. Westbrook has a path to big snaps in 2018 if he can fend off Keelan Cole, Donte Moncrief and D.J. Chark behind Marqise Lee. Consider him late in your draft.


Williams, Mike - LAC

Williams, Mike

The Chargers selected Williams with the seventh overall pick in the 2017 draft. A back injury limited the Clemson product to 10 games as a rookie, and he was on the field for only 37 percent of the team's pass plays when active. That limited him to 11 catches for 95 yards and no scores on 22 targets. Williams isn't particularly fast, but he has good size at 6-foot-3, 218 pounds. The Chargers' top three receivers from 2017 are expected back, so Williams will need to progress in order to emerge as a fantasy threat in his second season. His draft pedigree and the Chargers' strong offense make him an appealing 2018 late-round flier.


Hollins, Mack - PHI

Hollins, Mack

At 6-foot-4, 221 pounds with 33.25-inch hands, Hollins was one of the biggest wide receivers to enter the NFL last season. The Eagles scooped him up in the fourth round of the draft and peppered him with 20 targets (fourth-most) during the 2017 preseason. Buried on the depth chart during the regular season, Hollins caught 16 of 22 targets for 226 yards and one touchdown on 268 snaps. Hollins showed flashes as a rookie and could eventually make noise in a larger role in the Eagles' highly productive offense. For now, he remains buried on Philadelphia's depth chart and is simply a name to monitor.


Godwin, Chris - TB

Godwin, Chris

Godwin, a 2017 third-round pick, was limited to 424 snaps as a rookie but looked like a future star when promoted into a larger role. During the three weeks in which he ran at least three-quarters of the team's pass routes, Godwin averaged 9.3 targets per game and ranked seventh at the position in fantasy points. He averaged 9.4 YPT and 15.4 YPR on 56 targets, both of which ranked in the top 15 at the position. Bucs GM Jason Licht said at the 2018 NFL combine that Godwin has 'earned the right for a bigger role,' but he remains behind Mike Evans, DeSean Jackson and slot man Adam Humphries on the depth chart. At least for now, Godwin is more of a top-end handcuff than a viable flex option.


Kupp, Cooper - LAR

Kupp, Cooper

The Rams’ offense turned things around in a hurry in the first season under Sean McVay and Kupp was a big factor in that success. Running 58 percent of his routes from the slot, he averaged a nice 2.02 yards per route run. Kupp dropped seven of his 69 catchable balls, which raises some concern. He finished with 62 receptions (90 targets) for 869 yards and five touchdowns. The depth chart is crowded at wide receiver and after seeing the price the team paid for Brandin Cooks, you have to wonder where Kupp will fall in the pecking order for targets in 2018. Still, he offered the 2017 production he offered with Sammy Watkins in the fold. Cooks doesn’t help matters, but Kupp will have a role.


Ross, John - CIN

Ross, John

Like so many of the other wide receivers from the class of 2017, Ross endured a lost rookie season. The Bengals reached for him at No. 9 overall last April and it backfired when he sustained myriad injuries. He rushed for 12 yards but failed to have a catch and was targeted just twice in three games. Marvin Lewis has already gone on the record this offseason in support of Ross and if healthy he could supplant Brandon LaFell to be the team’s No. 2 wideout. He has much to prove though before being considered in redraft leagues.


Darboh, Amara - SEA

Darboh, Amara

Seattle snagged Darboh with a third-round pick in last year's draft, but the Michigan product was held to 182 snaps during his rookie season. Darboh caught eight of 13 targets for 71 yards. He isn't particularly fast but is big (6-foot-2, 214 pounds) with long arms and big hands and was a productive downfield threat at Michigan. With Paul Richardson gone, Darboh will compete with Jaron Brown and Marcus Johnson for Seattle's No. 3 gig behind Tyler Lockett and Doug Baldwin. He's a deep sleeper.


Cole, Keelan - JAC

Cole, Keelan

Cole burst onto the fantasy scene late last season, posting a 23-475-3 line and the fifth-most fantasy points among wide receivers from Week 13 on. The undrafted rookie was efficient on 81 season targets, posting the position's second-best yards per reception (17.8) and third-best average run after the catch (7.1). However, it's important to note that Cole's playing time dipped drastically once his teammates returned to full health. Cole ranked fourth among the team's wideouts in routes and targets during three playoff games. With Marqise Lee, Donte Moncrief, Dede Westbrook and rookie D.J. Chark in the fold in a run-heavy offense, Cole has a tough path to consistent targets. Unless he climbs the depth chart, Cole is barely worth a late-round flier.


Golladay, Kenny - DET

Golladay, Kenny

Golladay missed six games of his rookie season due to injury, but it was otherwise a successful campaign for the third-round pick. The Northern Illinois product was on the field for 69 percent of the team's pass plays when healthy, and he caught 28 of 47 targets for 477 yards and three touchdowns. Golladay, who stands 6-foot-4 with 4.50 wheels, will enter his second season buried behind Marvin Jones and Golden Tate, but he has shown flashes to suggest that a breakout could be on the horizon. At the very least, he'll play a significant role near the goal line and make for a high-ceiling handcuff.


Jones, Zay - BUF

Jones, Zay

Jones was selected in the second round of the 2016 draft, and Buffalo's weak wide receiver unit forced him into a massive rookie season role. He was on the field for 79 percent of the team's plays and handled 4.5 targets per game, but he caught only 27 of 68 targets for 316 yards and two touchdowns. His 40 percent catch rate (second-worst) and 4.6 YPT (worst) are especially shocking, considering he set an NCAA record with 158 catches (72 percent catch rate) at East Carolina in 2016. Buffalo's shaky quarterback situation and run-heavy offense are red flags, but Jones' college resume, strong combine and easy path to big snaps make the second-year receiver an intriguing late-round flier.


Williams, Chad - ARI

Williams, Chad

Williams was a bit of a surprising third-round pick out of Grambling State last year. He played a minimal role as a rookie, seeing the field for only 68 pass plays. He caught 3 of 7 targets for 31 yards on the season. With the likes of Christian Kirk, J.J. Nelson and Brice Butler behind Larry Fitzgerald on the depth chart, Williams has a path to a much larger role in his second season. His progress is worth monitoring leading up to your draft.




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