Ask the Commish.Com

The Fantasy Advisors

     

2019 VIP Draft Kit


Table of Contents




Draft Day Advice
-General Advice
-Position Advice

-2019 NFL Schedule
-Strength of Schedule


QB Statistical Analysis
-2018 Top Performances
-2018 Most Fantasy Points
-2018 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2018 Median Fantasy Points
-2018 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2019 Schedule
-Easiest 2019 Playoff Schedule

RB Statistical Analysis
-2018 Top Performances
-2018 Most Fantasy Points
-2018 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2018 Median Fantasy Points
-2018 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2019 Schedule
-Easiest 2019 Playoff Schedule

WR Statistical Analysis
-2018 Top Performances
-2018 Most Fantasy Points
-2018 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2018 Median Fantasy Points
-2018 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2019 Schedule
-Easiest 2019 Playoff Schedule

TE Statistical Analysis
-2018 Top Performances
-2018 Most Fantasy Points
-2018 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2018 Median Fantasy Points
-2018 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2019 Schedule
-Easiest 2019 Playoff Schedule

Kicker Statistical Analysis
-2018 Top Performances
-2018 Most Fantasy Points
-2018 Most Avg Fantasy Points
-2018 Median Fantasy Points
-2018 Most Consistent
-Easiest 2019 Schedule
-Easiest 2019 Playoff Schedule

2018 Defense Rankings
-Fantasy Points Allowed (Total)
-Fantasy Points Allowed QBs
-Fantasy Points Allowed RBs
-Fantasy Points Allowed WRs
-Fantasy Points Allowed TEs
-Fantasy Points Allowed Ks

Proven Draft Strategy
-Numerical Analysis
-GCAM (Overview)
-GCAM (QBs)
-GCAM (RBs)
-GCAM (WRs)
-GCAM (TEs)
-GCAM (PKs)
-GCAM (D/ST)

Targets, Carries and Touches
-2018 Most Targets
-2018 Most Carries
-2018 Most Touches

Redzone Analysis
-2018 Redzone Passing
-2018 Redzone Rushing
-2018 Redzone Receiving
-2018 Redzone Touches

Depth Charts
-AFC East
-AFC North
-AFC South
-AFC West
-NFC East
-NFC North
-NFC South
-NFC West

Nagging Injuries
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs

Moving Truck Tracker
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs

Rookie Report
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-Dynasty/Rookie Snapshot

Sophomore Status
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs

Fantasy Studs
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-D/ST

Sleepers
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-D/ST

Duds
-QBs
-RBs
-WRs
-TEs
-PKs
-D/ST

Average Draft Position
-Top 150
-QB
-RB
-WR
-TE
-PK
-D/ST
-DL
-LB
-DB

ATC Cheat Sheets
QB Rankings
RB Rankings
WR Rankings
TE Rankings
PK Rankings
Team Defense/Special Teams Rankings
DL Rankings
LB Rankings
DB Rankings
Draft Board Snapshot
Top 200 Players Overall
Top 216 Auction Values

MOCK DRAFT

Ask the Commish.Com
2019
Draft Kit

RB Rookies

 

Weber, Mike - DAL

Weber, Mike

The Cowboys selected rookie running back Mike Weber in the seventh round of the NFL Draft from Ohio State, and he's expected to compete with Darius Jackson and fellow rookie Tony Pollard for the backup running back job in Dallas behind Ezekiel Elliott. Most likely, Jackson will be in that spot, but Weber could win the job with a strong training camp. If Weber is No. 2 on the depth chart then he could be worth a late-round flier in deeper leagues, especially if you draft Elliott in Round 1.


Jacobs, Josh - OAK

Jacobs, Josh

Jacobs was the first running back selected in the draft and he has very little competition for early down work in Oakland. Isaiah Crowell tore his Achilles, and he was replaced by Doug Martin. Jacobs should be a true workhorse on an improved offense and 1,000 yards feels like a near lock.. This offense only ran the ball 387 times in 2018 and they added Antonio Brown and Tyrell Williams in the offseason. We still don't know how improved the offense will be, which could limit Jacobs' touchdown upside. Maybe most importantly, Jalen Richard led the Raiders backs with 81 targets last year and he's still on the roster.


Montgomery, David - CHI

Montgomery, David

Jordan Howard has 250 carries in 2018 and Montgomery should slide right into that role. What he has on Howard is a more complete game, with good chops in the receiving game. This will allow the Bears to be less predictable on offense and should help keep Montgomery on the field.. Montgomery's ability in the passing game may not matter since he's sharing a backfield with Cohen. Also, Cohen isn't the only back he's sharing with. The Bears signed Mike Davis in the offseason and Davis has a lot of the same positive qualities as Montgomery. There's no guarantee Montgomery is dominating early-down touches to start the season.


Singletary, Devin - BUF

Singletary, Devin

The Bills selected running back Devin Singletary in the third round of the NFL Draft from FAU, and he will compete for the backup role behind LeSean McCoy right away. Buffalo also has Frank Gore and T.J. Yeldon on the roster, but Singletary should be given the best chance to play behind McCoy - and possibly in tandem. He looks like a McCoy clone, and he could be the eventual starter for the Bills in 2020. We recommend drafting Singletary with a late-round pick in all seasonal leagues this year, and he's a second-round choice in all rookie-only drafts for dynasty formats.


Johnson, Ty - DET

Johnson, Ty

Maryland's Ty Johnson brings speed to the Lions offense and special teams. At Maryland he had nearly 4,200 all-purpose yards in his career and averaged 7.6 yards per rush. He's not a physical back but he does have some nice feet, is capable of catching passes and is tough. Expect him to compete for a role on special teams first, then crack the offense if opportunities present themselves. Only long-term thinkers need apply for Johnson's skills with a late-round pick.


Armstead, Ryquell - JAC

Armstead, Ryquell

Ryquell Armstead could emerge as the primary backup to Leonard Fournette in Jacksonville, a good job given Fournette's past. Armstead is a bully of a runner, powering downhill through defenders with good speed. He can also block fairly well, but he's not elusive and doesn't offer a whole lot as a pass-catcher, limiting his value. If he can improve in those areas, he'll have an opportunity sooner or later to be worthy of a Fantasy roster space. You may see Armstead get taken late in seasonal leagues but that's not a good idea until we're sure of his spot on the depth chart. Until then, draft him late in long-term formats and with a third-rounder in rookie-only drafts.


Pollard, Tony - DAL

Pollard, Tony

The Cowboys selected rookie running back Tony Pollard in the fourth round of the NFL Draft from Memphis, and he's expected to compete with Darius Jackson and fellow rookie Mike Weber for the backup running back job in Dallas behind Ezekiel Elliott. Most likely, Jackson will be in that spot, but Pollard could carve out touches in a hybrid role as a running back and receiver. That said, it isn't likely to be many touches, but keep an eye on his role in training camp. He could be worth a late-round flier in seasonal leagues if he's No. 2 on the depth chart behind Elliott.


Harris, Damien - NE

Harris, Damien

Harris is a rock-solid running back and one who will make coaches very happy. He runs downhill and gets what’s blocked, sometimes more. With Sony Michel dealing with a chronic knee injury, the Patriots likely grabbed Harris as high-priced insurance in the third-round. Damien Harris currently sports the coveted title of “cheapest New England running back to draft in fantasy,” and in April’s NFL Draft, he was only picked 17 spots after the Rams’ Darrell Henderson (who no one is sleeping on at this point). The Patriots maximize the skills of their players, so Harris should produce when called upon, as they continue to lean on the run and save Tom Brady for another inevitable playoff run. Remember that Harris beat out Josh Jacobs in college, so expecting the same against Sony Michel and Rex Burkhead in the pros isn’t a stretch, especially considering those veterans’ checkered injury histories.


Wesco, Trevon - NYJ

Wesco, Trevon

The Jets selected rookie Trevon Wesco in the fourth round from West Virginia, and he will compete to be the No. 2 tight end this season behind Chris Herndon. His main competition will come from Jordan Leggett, Neal Sterling and Eric Tomlinson, but Wesco could easily win that job with a strong training camp. We don't recommend drafting Wesco is most seasonal leagues, and he's only worth a late-round flier in deep rookie-only drafts.


Hill, Justice - BAL

Hill, Justice

It's believed that Justice Hill will begin his career as a change-of-pace running back for the Ravens. For a squad that wants to run as much as possible, that's welcomed news. Hill was a featured back at Oklahoma State, consistently averaging at least 5.5 yards per rush and finding the end zone 31 times in 36 games. He did this with his fleet feet and juke moves, accelerating to burn past slower defenders and cutting to find room to run. He showed enough as a receiver (49 catches in three years) to be useful in passing situations, too. Where he's lacking is in size - his slight frame hurts him when it comes to pushing piles, breaking tackles and blocking. Odds are the Ravens will ask Hill to make an impact on 8-to-10 touches per week, marrying his speed with the rest of the burners in this run-friendly offense. Bank on him going in Round 11 or later in seasonal drafts this summer. As for long-term leagues, expect him to get taken a round sooner, while in rookie-only formats he'll get nabbed in late Round 2. The odds aren't good he'll be the Ravens' lead back one day, but it's not out of the question.


Williams, Trayveon - CIN

Williams, Trayveon

One of the draft's most underrated running back prospects found himself in one of the most road-blocked depth charts in the league in Cincinnati. Trayveon Williams was a fun player at Texas A&M, breaking out in his junior year for nearly 2,000 total yards and 19 total touchdowns. He's a fast, explosive running back with very nice hands and better-than-expected physicality for a guy his size (5-8, 206). No one's drafting him with the idea that he'll overtake Joe Mixon one day, but it might not take long for him to settle in as the primary backup for the Bengals ahead of fellow rookie Rodney Anderson and veteran Giovani Bernard. He should be stashed with a late-round choice in long-term formats and rookie-only drafts.


Anderson, Rodney - CIN

Anderson, Rodney

If not for his massive injury concerns, Rodney Anderson would have been a second- or third-round pick in the draft. Instead, the Bengals nabbed him in Round 6. When he's on the field, Anderson is strong, sure-handed and able to lay a block. He lacks the explosive speed you want from a rusher, and it's unknown if he'll get it back after tearing his ACL last September. He has also fractured a vertebrae and broken his left leg. There's a chance the Bengals "redshirt" Anderson and hope he contributes in 2020. Or, if he's all set for training camp, he'll compete for a spot on the depth chart with fellow rookie Trayveon Williams and veteran Giovani Bernard. Either way, Anderson doesn't offer much excitement. No one will draft him in seasonal leagues, but he's in consideration for one of the last picks in long-term drafts and rookie-only formats.


Sanders, Miles - PHI

Sanders, Miles

You could make the argument Sanders landed in the best spot of any rookie. The Eagles have a high-powered offense and Sanders can handle both the running and the passing downs. Jordan Howard shouldn't stand in the talented rookie's way.. The Eagles do have a high-powered offense but they have been reluctant to lean on any one back. Josh Adams led the team with 120 carries last year. LeGarrette Blount's 173 carries are the most any back has earned in Doug Pederson's tenure in Philadelphia. There's a low floor because of Howard and a low ceiling even if Sanders earns the starting role.


Love, Bryce - WAS

Love, Bryce

Washington selected rookie running back Bryce Love from Stanford in the fourth round of the NFL Draft, and he will compete for a reserve role this season. Love is coming off a torn ACL from last year, and he's hoping to be ready by training camp. This season, if healthy, Love will likely be No. 4 on the depth chart behind Derrius Guice, Adrian Peterson and Chris Thompson. But Love and Guice could be Washington's tandem of running backs as early as 2020 since Peterson is near the end of his career, and Thompson is in the final year of his contract. We don't recommend drafting Love in most seasonal leagues, but he is worth a late-round flier in rookie-only drafts.


Mattison, Alexander - MIN

Mattison, Alexander

Alexander Mattison has a great chance to back up Dalvin Cook in Minnesota this season and beyond. A strong, well-built runner with good hands, Mattison had back-to-back 1,300-total-yard campaigns at Boise State with 30 total touchdowns. To get those numbers, he needed 514 carries and 55 catches, volume he won't see in 2019. However, Cook has missed time in each of his first two seasons, so Mattison should see some action at some point assuming he's the Vikings' No. 2 runner. He's not a burner and needs a lot of touches to be an impactful running back. Drafting him in Round 10 and beyond as the handcuff to Cook seems like a good idea in seasonal leagues. He'll get taken in the same spot in dynasty/keeper leagues and will find his way into Round 2 (maybe early Round 3) in rookie-only drafts.


Ollison, Qadree - ATL

Ollison, Qadree

The Falcons drafted Pitt running back Qadree Ollison with the hope he'd eventually become a good complement to their run game, similar to how they drafted Ito Smith last year. It's unlikely Ollison will make a major impact in 2019, but the one-cut runner has good size and power to rumble between the tackles. With the long-term outlook in mind, Ollison is only worth a late pick in rookie-only drafts.


Scarlett, Jordan - CAR

Scarlett, Jordan

Jordan Scarlett does have some skills that the Panthers might eventually lean on him for. A physical specimen with the blocking skills to match, Scarlett used quickness and aggression to power through defenses in 2016 and 2018, totaling 11 rushing touchdowns and 1,665 rush yards. He didn't play in 2017 because he was accused of participating in a credit card fraud scandal (the charges were dropped). He also has a marijuana possession misdemeanor in his past that cost him a game. Even if he were an angel off the field, Scarlett lacks the speed and nuanced receiving skills to be a dangerous every-down back. He'd need volume to be effective in Fantasy, and that's not going to happen with Christian McCaffrey starting for the Panthers. Not worth taking in seasonal leagues, Scarlett only registers as a late-round choice in long-term formats and rookie-only drafts.


Henderson, Darrell - LAR

Henderson, Darrell

The Rams selected rookie running back Darrell Henderson in the third round of the NFL Draft from Memphis, and he's expected to be No. 2 on the depth chart behind Todd Gurley. That should make him a popular Fantasy option given the concerns about Gurley's knee following the end of last season. Gurley missed two games at the end of the regular season in 2018 and then struggled in the playoffs, and reports surfaced that his knee could be a long-term problem. After drafting Henderson, Rams coach Sean McVay said the team could use more two-back formations this year, with Henderson competing with Malcolm Brown for that secondary role. We expect Henderson to win the job, and he's someone to consider as a sleeper with a mid-round pick in seasonal leagues. And obviously his value would skyrocket if Gurley missed any time due to injury. In rookie-only drafts, Henderson should be selected early in Round 2.


Homer, Travis - SEA

Homer, Travis

The Seahawks selected rookie running back Travis Homer in the sixth round of the NFL Draft from Miami, and he's expected to compete for a reserve role this year. Homer, at best, will be No. 3 on the depth chart behind Chris Carson and Rashaad Penny, and he will compete with C.J. Prosise, J.D. McKissic and Bo Scarbrough for that job. Keep an eye on his role in training camp, but Homer is not worth selecting in most seasonal leagues, including rookie-only drafts.




Previous   Next

© 2019 ATC All rights reserved.